e-CareManagement blog

Chronic Disease Management • Technology • Strategy • Issues and Trends

Archive for the "PHIN (Personal Health Information Network)" category

Hospitals or Health Plans: Who Do You Trust to “Connect” You with Your Health Records?

Over the past decade, I’ve seen a number of studies asking people whom they trust among various health care stakeholders. Nurses, pharmacists, and doctors always come out at the top.  Beyond that: Trust of hospitals tends to be high (60–80%) Trust of health plans is at the bottom of the heap (10–20%) Is this written in […]

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Walled Gardens vs. the Open Web: A Central Debate in Tech Finally Coming to Healthcare

The September issue of Wired magazine and an article in last Sunday’s New York Times illustrate a central debate in technology circles. The debate is not new — it’s being going on for two decades — but it has newfound vibrancy. The essence of the debate is about competing tech/business models: walled gardens vs. the […]

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We’re Building a REALLY BIG Health Internet!

How big a network will the Health Internet (aka National Health Information Network) be? My BOTE (back-of-the-envelope) calculation is that this network could consist of about 301 million nodes.  Here’s my math (pls. clarify or amplify): 300 million individuals in U.S. 700 K doctors 5 K hospitals 295 K — other B2B healthcare entities Very rough…but I hope you get […]

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The Third Rail in HITECH Implementation: “Please Don’t Make Us All Speak Latin”

By Vince Kuraitis and Steven Waldren MD, MS.  Dr Waldren is Director of the Center for Health Information Technology at the American Academy of Family Practice (AAFP). Two issues have rightfully surfaced front and center in the public’s understanding of HITECH Act implementation: ” definition of “Meaningful Use” of EHRs, and ” definition of “certification” […]

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What’s a Network Industry? Is Healthcare One?

This post is a foundational overview of characteristics of network industries.  Much of the terminology will deserve deeper discussion, but we have to start somewhere. In his book The Economics of Network Industries, Professor Oz Shy lists four characteristics of network industries. The main characteristics of these markets which distinguish them from the market for grain, dairy products, apples, and […]

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Intro to a New Series

  “We need to make care linkages a core competency of American health care.”  George Halvorson, Chairman and CEO, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Kaiser Foundation Hospital   There’s a double meaning to the title of this new series: Healthcare Crosses the Chasm to the Network Economy At the level of technology, it’s a reference to Geoffrey Moore’s […]

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Microsoft HealthVault is a Serious Business Strategy. Will Google Health Become More than a Hobby?

Google Health…please stick around….but please also get your stuff together. Over the past few days, several of my respected colleagues have written excellent blog posts essentially asking “Does Google Health have life?” Scott Shreeve — CLEAR! Shocking Google Health Back to Life John Moore — Is Google Health Irrelevant? Will Crawford — Future of Google Health I […]

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Overcoming The Penguin Problem: Setting Expectations for EHR Adoption

                Economists call it “The Penguin Problem”  — No one moves unless everyone moves, so no one moves.  The role of user expectations is crucial in getting penguins to move off of ice floes and in the successful adoption of new network technologies.  I’ll cover two main points in today’s […]

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Blueprint for Change: From EMR 1.0 to Clinical Groupware (EHR 2.0)

by Vince Kuraitis JD, MBA and David C. Kibbe MD, MBA The last article in this series — Time for EHRs to Become Plug-and-Play — used words to describe a major industry shift underway in health IT. Sometimes pictures help to make a point. Here are several diagrams that you can also download as PowerPoint slides.  Computer […]

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